Charting your log data lately?

I came across this cool howTo over at Linux Planet that shows an example of how to easily create graphs of log data.  The article gives a good pratical example of pulling some data on TLD's that have bounced bad e-mail.  The tool he uses is python with a graphing library that can do output as HTML or several other formats.  It's a great easy way to show people when problems are happening.  

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Need a quick pick me up for a slowing application?

If the application you are having problems with does a lot of reading and writing to files a quick fix might be to use a RAM based file system.  Yes that precious RAM we all love to have for our apps might be better spent creating a temporary file system.  If you then copy the often written to application files onto this RAM based file system you should see tremendous performance increases.  With systems running the Core i7 architecture the boost could be even higher because of the higher RAM speeds and lower latency between the CPU and the chips.  The only way to find out though is to give it a try.  To do that you will need a RAM Disk of some kind.  I found this how to over at Linux Mag that should be a good starting point.  While I haven't done these exact instructions, I have done this before and they seem to be correct.  As with anything though your mileage may very.  Test your solution thoroughly before implementing this in a production environment.  Remember you are dealing with RAM and if you have to reboot anything not saved off from that RAM Disk will be lost.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.