Can virtual pc's get linux on your desktop?

I came across an interesting article today over at techworld.com about the issues with migrating to a Linux Desktop.  The article makes serveral really good points about whether or not you will really see the R in the ROI and how Virtual PCs might just finally make it all work out for companies of all sizes.  The trick is, as it's always been, getting people to do things they aren't familar with. 

 

What do you think, can Virutal PC's enhance Linux Adoption?  Let us know in the comments below.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Are you an oprotunistic developer?

Jono Bacon, Community Manager at Ubuntu, has assembled a nice article about what one needs to write the quick and scratch your own itch applications Linux and FLOSS are known for without a lot of hassle.  The concept hearkens back to the good old days of Unix when apps were focused on doing one task and doing it well.  His article is a great getting started guide to help you easily find the parts you will need.  Check it out.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.