Adobe let's Open Source Developers Lead AIR on Linux

The register is reporting that Adobe is turning over development of the recent abandon AIR application to an open source consortium.  The Open Screen Project(OSP) will take over AIR development.  This is a group of companies including tech power-houses Google, Intel and Motorola.  Hopefully this will help it keep pace with the Mac and Windows versions.  All of these companies have a vested interest in Linux and teams that are used to develop on and for Linux.  So we think there are great things to come.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Adobe takes AIR out of Linux

Adobe announced today in a blog post that they will no longer be supporting AIR on Linux.  This link over to Phoronix has a great description of the details.  It sounds like they will be allowing other partners to provide AIR Clients but they won't be providing one.  So another Adobe product bites the dust on Linux.  So much for cross platform development and build once run anywhere promises yet again.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.