Building a low power home server for less than $80....

So my friend Walt was looking for a way to store his media on his network.  He had been running a freeNAS box for years but really wanted to turn off the loud power hunger 10 year old machine in the corner.  So he started researching and first converted a $30 PogoPlug to ArchLinux.  This worked but while surfing he found out that a GoFlex could also be converted to run ArchLinux.  As he discusses this gives him two advantages.  The first is internal 1GB SATA disk is going to be faster than any USB drive.  The second is by having an internal disk he can assign a real swap space.  It also will let things comiple faster in Arch.  Check out his articles and let us know what you would do with the server.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

The US DOJ is finally done investigating the Novell Patent deal...

The US Department of Justice seems to be done looking into the Patent deals that were a result of the Attachemate merger with Novell.  The good news is that they don't see any red flags.  It's yet to be seen if they will do anything agressive with them.  Linux should be safe becuase the DOJ says there is no way to get them out of the governance of the Open Invention Network.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Episode 63 - To V or not to V that is the OpenStack question...

Check out this weeks episode when we talk about Linux Cinomon, Whether Open stack can and should stop supporting hyperV, and more
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