Novell and Attachmate deal delayed until April...

Novell has filled an update to it's SEC fillings stating that the DOJ has requested more documentation about the Patent Portfolio that will be sold to CPTN.  CPTN is a weird mix of companies including most notably Apple and Microsoft. The DOJ is trying to determine if there is anything they should be investigating about this part of the deal.  Guess we in the Tech community weren't the only ones thinking it was strange.  Hopefully we will here from the DOJ about what, if anything, they find.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Application Installers Unite.....

According to this article we found, meetings are starting to happen and people are trying to move towards a common Application Installer. So their could be the end of the "My package manager is better than yours is" debates?  Well it's a bit early to tell but it does sound like the big distros are talking about settling on a common package format.  If they do go forward with this we can only hope that it's adoption moves faster than LSB(Linux Standards Base).  It would definitely go a long way to help adoption of Linux as a platform.  For instance, only seeing one line on download pages like Windows and Mac have would help newbies or people thinking about trying linux be less afraid.  When you can create app stores that only have to carry one type of package they become a lot easier to create.  We here at linuxinstall.net hope that every linux install will get easier over time.

What do you think?  What problems will one package format have?  What hidden benefits are there?  What hidden problems?

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Episode 37 - Top things that happened in 2010

Running Time:  43:19

1) Introduction

2) This is a running list of things to consider for the top news of 2010

 Big Purchases in 2010:

   Novell get’s purchased - the patents that went to Microsoft

   Oracle buying Sun

   Palm get’s bought by HP

 Changes in the world of Open Source:

   Google World:

    Android shoots for world domination - Or at least Mobile Platform domination

    Google TV announced and delivered

    Chrome OS Pilot Program announced Beta’s of Chrome OS on VM’s

   Ubuntu abandons Xorg and Gnome for Wayland and Unity

   Mandrivia struggling/passing away...

   Tablet Market exploded with the introduction of IPad and Galaxy Tablet

3) Conclusion

  Recommendations for People to interview

  E-Mail us at podcast@linuxinstall.net

  Go to the WebSite to call us via Google Voice

  Facebook Fan Page

  Follow us on Twitter and Identica as @linuxinstall

  Look for us and comment on iTunes, odeo


Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.