Is Linux a fragmented operating system...

ITWorld.com has a great article that discusses how different development is in today's world as compared to say 10 years ago.  They focus on the fact that Linux is at the core of so many devices these days how can you know what hardware platform your app will need to run on?  The article asks lots of interesting quesitons and has some ideas of where we are going.  Where do you think we are headed?  Is having so many different ways to use linux, i.e. Phones, Laptops, tablets, making it harder or easier to program?

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Are you looking for a new development language?

Here are ten new ones to look at over on inforworld.com.  While new languages come out all the time there are only two on this list that anyone here at linuxinstall.net had even heard of.  Before you decide to build your next startup on one of these make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.  The road to today's modern languages is paved with the dead languages that came before them.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

How SmugMug lived through the Amazon Outage....

While surfing around the other day looking for stories about the Amazon Outage I came across this story about how SmugMug managed to come through it basicly unaffected.  The article is written by Don MacAskill acording to his LinkedIn Profile he is Co-Founder, CEO, & Chief Geek at SmugMug.  The article goes through a lot of inforation and I warn you now that it is a long article.  I suggest reading it so that you can start understanding the limitations in the Cloud and what can be done to avoid it.  (Tip: Read the links to the Forum Posts.  A lot of the comments are pretty bad.)

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.