HP says yes to Mr. Shuttleworth....

HP Announced that they have certified the 12.04 release of Ubuntu for use with their hardware.  While there was never a time when it wouldn't have run this means that support calls will get answered.  This certification shows both HP commitment to Linux and the Ubuntu specificly.  We love seeing HP support linux and really starting to focus on it.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Episode 68 - It takes a billion...

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

Red Hat is a bigger contributer to OpenStack than Canonical...

Red Hat who wasn't a member of the OpenStack Alliance/Group until this week has contributed more code than Ubuntu's parent company and a founding member.  The big surprise for some of us here was that Rackspace, someone we don't normally assocaite with software development, is the number one developer on the project.  They account for 55% of the code followed by Nebula with 10%.  Red Hat accounted for 7.9% and Canonical put up a mere 2.6%.  Sounds pretty lopsided?  Well when you think about the fact that there are more than 150 companies that are part of the group they all look pretty good.  Supporting open products should be applauded by both of these.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.