Care and feeding of Databases on Linux is important...

In this article over at Database Journal they explain how to de-fragment your mysql database.  If you are like me you don't normally think about anything but file systems getting fragmented.  It seems from this article that for very similar reasons Databases get fragmented and should have the white space in the compressed out just like on a file system.  They same types of performance benifits can also be found when doing this.

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.

5 thing for and 5 things against NoSQL databases...

We have been hearing a lot about NoSQL databases over the last couple of years.  If you are curious about what the good and bad things about them who better to ask than the nice folks over at Database Journal.  They wrote a great article that should help you get started on your path to determinng whether NoSQL databases are right for your next project.  There were several other links on the page pointing to deeper discussions on the topic of NoSQL databases.  It's a very balanced and well thought out article worth the time to read. 

Brian Wagner

Brian started working with *nix in while a student at Kent State University in the early 90's. In 1995, as an E-Mail Administrator for Caliber Technology (now part of Fedex) he was tasked with administering Sendmail on both Slackware Linux and Solaris Systems. His first home install of Linux was MkLinux DR1 in 1996 on his 60 Mhz PowerMac. Since then Brian has been working and consulting on Linux and it's uses in the Enterprise to support everything from E-Mail, Firewalls, Web and File serving to custom cluster solutions and grid solutions. Brian has had the opportunity to work in both Fortune 500 companies and small 2 person organizations. This has given him the unique insight into the differences every size business faces.